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20171109-Thanksgiving dinner2

How to Make A Backcountry Thanksgiving Feast

If you’re heading to the backcountry this Thanksgiving, you don’t have to forego a traditional holiday meal just because you’re away from civilization. With a bit of early meal planning and a trip to the grocery store, you can feast on turkey and all the trimmings while you’re enjoying a night under the stars.

With this meal plan, you won’t spend a great amount of time prepping and cooking. But, you might need to pack a few items that aren’t as lightweight as what you’d typically carry into the backcountry. No, you don’t have to tote a Dutch oven, but you might need to carry a few canned goods, as well as extra pots and bowls to prepare and serve all of the food. If possible, eat your Thanksgiving feast the first night of any multi-day trip so you don’t have to carry the food weight for long. Also, you’ll need to adjust the following recipes to suit the size of your group.

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Climbing Mt Rainier

Mt. Rainier

A few months back, I picked up a copy of “Life on the Edge” by Jim Whittaker.

Mt. Rainier is a centerpiece of the first few chapters, which got me curious about the mountain itself. After doing a bit of research, I concluded that it could be a good challenge at this point in my uphill habits.

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20181012-Kentucky-Mammoth Cave

Halloween Hikes: The Spookiest Trails in America

There’s nothing like a scary story or creepy folklore to add some extra spirit to your hike. And there’s no better season than fall—the time for haunts and haints—to point your hiking boots in the direction of the spooky trails across the United States. The these hikes all feature some association with the supernatural (or, in one case, with a resident creature called a “cryptid”), from a little but mighty portentous black dog to a caterwauling spirit giving voice to her grief alongside one of the greatest canyons on the planet.

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20181009-Colorado-Great Sand Dunes National Park

The Spookiest Places in National Parks

America’s National Parks are home to beautiful vistas, miles of backcountry adventures—and stories that nightmares are made of. Wait, what? That’s right: Dig a little deeper into the history and legends of these beloved outdoor playgrounds, and you may find yourself quickening your pace on the trail. From creepy creatures to mysterious curses to downright terrifying tales, here are some of the spookiest spots in our national parks.

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20170828_Backpacking_01

8 Pro Tips for Spending a Year Living Out of Your Backpack

Taking a year to backpack abroad after college is an idea that just about every young person toys with at one point or another. After all, riding trains to places with unpronounceable names, tasting exotic foods, and meeting fascinating people in faraway places sure has more of a romantic appeal than growing your LinkedIn network and emailing out (unanswered) resumes and applications.

While I’d spent most of my young life vaguely planning a post-college backpacking trip, I spent senior year intensively laying out my grand escape.

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20171124_Beach

How to Introduce a Loved One to Adventure Travel

“Are you crazy?” my friend exclaimed. “He’ll never want to travel again!” I simply smiled. We were catching up and discussing my upcoming travel plans, which involved a multi-day jungle trek with my city-slicker brother in tow.

I’m a well-seasoned travel vet, with more than 35 countries on my passport. On the contrary, my younger brother had never left the country. Somehow, I had managed to convince him to come trekking and surfing in Colombia with me. We decided on the destination together. He wanted to visit some place tropical, but one that didn’t have a resort vibe. I can’t resist the temptation of a good hike. After a month or two of back and forth, we settled on Colombia.

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Insider Tips for Your First Backpacking Trip

From the rocky outcrops of the Talladega National Forest to the waterfalls of the Sipsey Wilderness, Alabama is home to many excellent backpacking trails that practically beg for an overnight adventure.

If you’ve only done day hikes, however, a longer overnight trek through the backcountry can seem slightly intimidating. But with a little research and planning, your first backpacking trip can be an amazing experience that paves the way for future adventures.

The rewards are well worth the planning and effort. Deep in the woods, you’ll discover the kind of scenery, solitude, and natural wonders that many people never experience. At night, beneath the stars, far away from civilization and crowds, you’ll savor a sense of calm that’s hard to find in today’s fast-paced, tech-saturated world.

To help you launch your first outing, we’ve compiled 10 insider tips to help you plan your route, choose the right gear, and travel comfortably and safely in the backcountry. Follow these guidelines, and your first backpacking trip will likely be the first of many.

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Sunrise on a peak like Skylight can be an incredible experience.

The 10 Best Day Hikes in the Adirondack High Peaks

For those on the West Coast, 4,000-foot peaks might not even be worth blinking at. Not so, in the East. With our cities, and even most of our trailheads, sitting at less than 1,000 feet above sea level, it’s the comparatively small 4- and 5,000 footers that tower above. But even if these ancient, weathered peaks may be somewhat modest in size compared to the behemoths of the West, it certainly doesn’t make them any less spectacular.

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20180515_Meg Atteberry_IMG_2435

Pro Tips on How to Find Your Secret Wilderness Hideaway

There is a string of mountains in Colorado I hold near and dear to my heart, where green high-alpine valleys dotted with wildflowers like confetti meet dizzying rock spires, and steep, grassy hillsides tumble into the shimmering waters of untouched lakes. The effort to reach this pristine wilderness is not for the faint of heart: Getting there often involves steep elevation gains, poorly maintained trails, or sometimes, no trail at all. It took me four years to find these spots, and I could spend a lifetime discovering every valley, ridgeline, and high alpine creek among them.

This glorious sense of discovering something new is at the heart of exploring the wilderness, but it’s getting harder and harder to do these days. People are getting outdoors in record numbers, which is generally a positive, but one downside is the increasing difficulty of finding that “secret” spot that no one knows about. But it’s these very places that keep the adventure alive. Here, a few tricks to finding your secret wilderness spot.

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Airport Survival Tactics

Airport Survival Tactics

I recently had the experience of an airplane mechanical malfunction that needed to be addressed before we could board our flight. One would hope that the reaction to such a thing would be good:

“Oh thank god, I’m glad we have the ability to foresee potential problems and address them to prevent catastrophes.”

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20181017-Washington-Wonderland Trail2

10 Amazing (and Attainable) Thru-Hikes Across the Country

Weekend backpacking trips are one of the greatest gifts of the summer. You can get so much in just two to three days: a breathtaking vista, a serene mountain lake, a secluded old-growth forest. The only problem is that all too soon you’re back at the trailhead, preparing for the long drive home and wondering how you’ll get through five more days before your next big adventure.

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23 Must-Visit American Cities for Outdoor Adventure Travel

So much to do, so little time. From the rolling mountains of the Southeast, to the jagged peaks of the West, to the river canyons, waterfalls, and old-growth forests of the Pacific Coast, the Continental United States is home to a lifetime’s worth of places to visit and things to do.

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winter camping kitchen

10 Tips for Winter Camping in Colorado

There’s no need to wait until warm weather to snooze under the stars. Winter camping in Colorado is a magical experience. The summer crowds are gone, a gentle quiet washes over the woods, and you don’t need to venture far to feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere. If you’re keen to give winter camping a try, follow these tips to make the most of a snowy night out.

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20171114-Alaska-Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ocean

8 Reasons the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a Must-Visit Destination (for the Bold at Heart).

If you dream of treading untouched wilderness, watching caribou stream across pristine tundra, and viewing polar bears prowling the coast, there’s one place on Earth with your name on it: The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Although the refuge often makes headlines for the decades-old battle against oil drilling that would disrupt its delicate ecological balance, this 19.2-million-acre wildlife sanctuary is truly remarkable for its immaculate wildness. It is a life-changing, otherworldly experience for the few hundreds of people who are bold enough to visit in any given year. Here are eight reasons why you should be one of them:

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Haiti Trip Emma Merinoholics Adventures

Human Kind: Haiti Trip

This past spring, I had the opportunity to spend a month in the Caribbean. The first three weeks were spent in Borgne, Haiti, a rural commune on the northern coast of the island. We worked with a group of women who are leaders in their community to train them in the Human Centered Design process and collaboratively executed a project to help further development of the community. It was a difficult three weeks, as resources were limited, but I would not trade the experience.READ MORE

Iceland Hiking Trip Chris Nancarrow Customer Submission

Iceland Hiking Trip

“I just wanted to thank you for a wonderful product. I purchased 2 Chocorua Midweight shirts for a weeklong hiking trip across Iceland’s Laugavegur and Fimmvörðuháls trails. The shirts kept me completely comfortable through the constantly changing temperatures and intense wind/rain storms. I even wear them casually when I work and go out for the evening.

 

Your Merino Wool Ridge Cuff Beanie also accompanied me on the hike and worked wonderfully. Iceland’s temperature in mid-September ranged between 25F and 55F and the beanie kept me warm while sleeping through the freezing nights.”

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