hikeSafe - Minus33® Merino Wool Clothing
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hikeSafe: It's your responsibility.

hikeSafe, along with the Hiker Responsibiity Code, was developed as a joint program between the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF) and the  New Hampshire Fish and Game Department (NHF&G) to create and develop a Mountain Safety Education Program – the first of its kind – for New Hampshire.

 

Minus33 is an official cooperator of the hikeSafe program. The goal of the hikeSafe program has long been to expand the program beyond New Hampshire and turn hikeSafe into a nationwide campaign for hiker safety and awareness. hikeSafe assets used by Minus33 are created and owned by the hikeSafe program, the New Hampshire Fish & Game, and by the White Mountain National Forest.

 

THE HIKER RESPONSIBILITY CODE WAS DEVELOPED AND IS ENDORSED BY THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST AND NEW HAMPSHIRE FISH AND GAME.

hikeSafe Blog

Read Before You Go Merinoholics Adventures Will

Read Before You Go

Read before you go.

 

There is an abundance of resources available these days to anyone looking to hit the trails. I encourage everyone to get a good guide book and map to plan their trip. Even with those available, use your common sense when out there.READ MORE

Unfinished Business Merinoholics Adventures Martin

Unfinished Business

Unfinished business: a trip back to where I left off

 

This summer, I felt ready.

I was going back to Pioneer Peak. Last year I got to the South Summit and back, after a fairly strenuous 10 hour-hike, over 12 miles and 6000 ft of elevation gain.
A ridge separates the South from the North Summit. There is only a 50 feet difference in height between the two summits, but I felt compelled to get to the top of the highest one. The ridge that separates the two peaks is pretty exposed and requires some fairly descent scrambling skills. I knew it could still be challenging but I wanted to try it.READ MORE

When Summit Fever Takes Over - Minus33 Merinoholics Adventures by Emma

When Summit Fever Takes Over

It’s 2am and we are speeding down a dark, empty highway, less than an hour after our plane landed in Ecuador. In the seats behind a taxi driver whose language I do not speak well, we are completely unaware of where we are or the direction we should be going in. The altitude and anxiety are kicking into full gear just as we finally pull up to the home of our host family. We sigh with relief as a friendly face helps us out of our car and greets us in broken English. Up until that moment, the limits of my comfort had never been pushed so far.READ MORE

minus 33 merino wool clothing, NH Wildlife, Moose in its natural habitat

Respect Wildlife: Moose

Moose may be New Hampshire’s best-known residents; there are an estimated 9,600 in the state. The largest land mammal in New Hampshire, an adult moose averages 1,000 pounds and is 6 feet tall at the shoulder. READ MORE

minus 33 merino wool clothing, insects in natural habitat

Respect Wildlife: Critters

CRITTERS

According to the U.S. Forest Service, there are 183 species of birds in the White Mountain National Forest: 38 species are found year round, 35 are migrants or winter species, and 110 are found during the summer months. In addition, deer, fox, raccoons, squirrels and many other mammals and amphibians may be seen.
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minus 33 merino wool clothing, Animals, bear in natural habitat.

Respect Wildlife: Bears

PREVENTING BEAR PROBLEMS

 

Black bears are found all over New Hampshire. Females typically weight 125 to 150 pounds while adult males tip the scales at 200 to 250 pounds.
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minus 33 merino wool clothing, Animals, deer in natural habitat.

Respect Wildlife

It’s estimated that between 94% and 97% of New Hampshire is undeveloped land, making vast amounts available for natural wildlife habitat. Some of the finest wildlife watching in the state can be enjoyed while hiking in the White Mountains.
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minus 33 merino wool clothing, be prepared to turn back from an outdoor trip. lightning, stormy weather

Be Prepared to Turn Back

Be prepared to turn back

 

One of the most common mistakes hikers make is the failure to turn back. Although “summit fever” can be a persuasive emotion, ambition is not a good reason to put oneself in a dangerous situation.
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