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From Alleghany National Forest to Haiti

This spring was a season of change and as always, adventure. I played my last college softball game, graduated with my Bachelor’s degree, completed a black diamond rope course (it was killer), adopted a puppy, traveled to Haiti, and started grad school.

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Top 5 Reasons to Wear Wool in the Summer

Top 5 Reasons to Wear Wool in the Summer

 

Wool is a winter favorite for obvious reasons – excellent insulative properties, can keep you warm even when wet, and its warmth-to-weight ratio makes it a packable favorite on the go. But did you know that the same properties that make Merino Wool so great in the winter can also apply to summer conditions? Check out our top 5 reasons to consider keeping your Merino Wool out for the summer.

 

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A Call Out, Mt. Lafayette

Its Saturday night right around 10:00 pm and I’m in the process of getting ready for bed. I’m brushing my teeth when my phone starts ringing and on the caller ID  it shows PVSAR, which is the acronym for Pemigewasset Valley Search and Rescue. READ MORE

Respect Wildlife: Moose

Moose may be New Hampshire’s best-known residents; there are an estimated 9,600 in the state. The largest land mammal in New Hampshire, an adult moose averages 1,000 pounds and is 6 feet tall at the shoulder. READ MORE

Respect Wildlife: Critters

CRITTERS

According to the U.S. Forest Service, there are 183 species of birds in the White Mountain National Forest: 38 species are found year round, 35 are migrants or winter species, and 110 are found during the summer months. In addition, deer, fox, raccoons, squirrels and many other mammals and amphibians may be seen.
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Respect Wildlife: Bears

PREVENTING BEAR PROBLEMS

 

Black bears are found all over New Hampshire. Females typically weight 125 to 150 pounds while adult males tip the scales at 200 to 250 pounds.
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Respect wildlife

It’s estimated that between 94% and 97% of New Hampshire is undeveloped land, making vast amounts available for natural wildlife habitat. Some of the finest wildlife watching in the state can be enjoyed while hiking in the White Mountains.
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Be prepared to turn back

Be prepared to turn back

 

One of the most common mistakes hikers make is the failure to turn back. Although “summit fever” can be a persuasive emotion, ambition is not a good reason to put oneself in a dangerous situation.
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Avalanches and Ice Falls

An avalanche is a very real winter hazard, especially in steeper ravines. Everyone in your group should have a good knowledge of avalanche safety. Education and training are critical, so each member of your group should take an avalanche safety course.
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Wool Gathering and Meditation

Woolgathering and Meditation

I recently discovered a new word that encapsulates my early twenties fairly well. It is an old word that has been around since domesticated sheep: Woolgathering.READ MORE

A Guide To Hiking With Your Dog

Hiking with your dog can add a wonderful dimension to your time on the trail—but you need to plan before you go. Note: In most states, if your dog is injured, search and rescue will not assist you. Be prepared to rescue your pet or find assistance on your own.READ MORE

A Child’s Guide to Hiking

A Child’s Guide to Hiking

 

Going for a hike can be a fun way to spend time in the outdoors. You may see plants and animals you’ve never seen before, and you’ll go places that only hikers go.

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Back for his fourth Olympics with USA Luge, Jon Wooten has created 2 helmet designs for Pyeongchang

Luge fans will decide which design will be worn by the 2018 Olympic team

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. – The mantra of luge is to be fast and cool. Jon Wooten nailed it in 2014 when Erin Hamlin, in a Wooten-painted helmet, raced to the first Olympic singles medal in USA Luge history. The three-time Olympian was also the first female in American luge history to stand on an Olympic podium.
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